Skin Treatments By Concern

Acne is a common concern across all ages, genders and skin types – and should really be addressed by a team of professionals where possible, not with over the counter medications or topical treatments that rarely lead to good results.

What is acne and how do you treat it?

Even once the inflammation of active acne has been treated, many sufferers need to move on to treating the scarring left behind.

 

What is acne scarring and how do you treat it?

A common skin condition characterised by generalised redness across the cheeks, nose, chin and between the brows, rosacea causes the skin to become sensitive and flush easily.

What is Rosacea and how how do you treat it?

Unwanted redness in the skin, usually across the face, can be a frustrating and highly visible concern for our patients, as the overall effect can look like you’re constantly flushed, sunburnt or even under the influence!

What is skin redness and how do you treat it?

Skin pigmentation refers to areas of the skin that are a different shade to your natural skin shade. This may simply be some freckles or it may affect a large area across the face, but the uneven skin tone is a common concern for our patients.

What is pigmentation and how do you treat it?

Also known as chloasma or pregnancy mask, melasma is a specific type of skin pigmentation that appears as patchy brown or black areas of excess melanin across the nose, cheeks and forehead, and sometimes even the forearms.

What is melasma and how do you treat it?

Some of us may enjoy the look of ‘sun kissed’ skin but in reality, it’s best to limit the relationship between the sun and our skin.

What is sun damage and how do you treat it?

Before you decide on an aesthetic treatment to address your concerns about skin texture, it’s important to note that all skin has texture! Social media and the wide use of filters has made us sometimes forget that texture is an inherently normal and beautiful part of what makes us individuals.

What is skin texture and how do you treat it?

When depleted of its natural oils and moisture, skin can become dry and feel uncomfortable and tight, looking flaky and dull. More severe cases can see dry skin itchy, red, sore and inflamed, even causing wrinkles and painful deep cracks.

What is dry skin and how do you treat it?

Vellus hair is also known as peach fuzz, is hair on the face that is mostly visible in sunlight, and tends to be softer, lighter and shorter than anywhere else on the body.

What is peach fuzz and how do you treat it?

Almost everyone knows when they have stretch marks, but you may not know they’re actually a type of scar, caused by elastin and collagen fibres breaking apart.

What are stretch marks & how do you treat them?

Dull skin can make its appearance for a number of reasons, but it refers to skin simply not being as happy and healthy as it could be. Dryness, cold, dry climates and general ageing are the main contributors, as skin slows down production of collagen and elastin, losing its laxity and rate of cell turnover.

What is skin dullness and how do you treat it?

Acne

What is acne?

Acne is a common concern across all ages, genders and skin types – and should really be addressed by a team of professionals where possible, not with over the counter medications or topical treatments that rarely lead to good results. In severe cases, acne is a medical condition not just an aesthetic concern, which is where you really should come in to see a qualified clinician.

The condition is caused by a range of underlying issues, which can be very effectively managed. Very often it’s genetic, but other causes include hyperactive sebum and oil production, dead skin blocking the pores or the acne-causing bacteria Propionibacterium acnes. The wrong makeup and skincare can also exacerbate acne, along with diet.

How do you treat acne?

There isn’t just one cause of acne, so there isn’t one single treatment approach, either. In your first consultation, we’ll assess your skin to identify the root cause of your own specific case, and develop a tailored treatment plan to reduce redness, inflammation, hyperpigmented scars and the general appearance of acne.

A simple, effective, medical-grade, skincare routine often forms the core of our treatment approach, likely including a gentle cleanser, exfoliation and a retinol which increases the natural turnover of the skin. If you wear make up, we’d also recommend moving to the mineral kind as many traditional formulas can be comedogenic, or likely to further block pores.

Chemical peels are another fantastic option for acne sufferers, as they remove dead skin cells that block pores and encourage the production of collagen-making cells for new, smooth skin. Salicylic acid peels are particularly beneficial as they also have anti-inflammatory properties.

If your acne is driven by bacteria, blue LED light therapy works particularly well to address inflammation and eliminate Propionibacterium acnes in the area.

Acne scarring

What is acne scarring?

Even once the inflammation of active acne has been treated, many sufferers need to move onto treating the scarring left behind. There are various kinds of scarring, including ice pick scars, box scars, rolling scars, and even hypertrophic or keloid scars which are raised instead of indents in the skin, caused by an overproduction of collagen throughout the healing process. Which type you have needs to be assessed, and depends on the form of acne that caused it, how it was treated, and your skin type.

Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) is also often mistaken for acne scarring, though it’s also caused by skin healing from other trauma like burns, dermatitis or infections. In the case of acne it is the dark pink, purple or brown mark, depending on your skin tone, that is left behind once the pimple resolves and it affects those with olive and darker skin tones more than others.

How do you treat acne scarring?

The type of scarring dictates what treatment we recommend, but we can make excellent progress to improve the appearance of acne scars.

Resurfacing treatments like radiofrequency (RF) microneedling and our erbium laser encourages smoother, tighter skin that can visibly reduce scarring. For very deep indentations, dermal fillers can be used to further smooth the skin.

Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation is temporary but can be reduced and helped along with a medical-grade skincare routine targeted to reduce skin pigmentation.

Rosacea

What is rosacea?

A common skin condition characterised by generalised redness across the cheeks, nose, chin and between the brows, rosacea causes the skin to become sensitive and flush easily. At a low level, rosacea can usually be covered with makeup, but severe cases can result in broken capillaries, pimple-like pustules and a stinging sensation across the skin.

The exact cause is unknown, though current research is looking into the condition being triggered by hot climates, UV radiation and sun exposure, bacteria and even a certain mite. There is no cure but treatments can relieve symptoms and reduce its appearance to it being unnoticeable.

How do you treat rosacea?

Some of the best ways to manage rosacea are completely non-clinical, like avoiding triggers in your diet and lifestyle like spicy foods, alcohol and heavy physical exercise. Managing menopausal symptoms can also help, as hot flushes can also be a trigger.

Using a considered, calming skincare regime is really important as well, since irritating ingredients like alcohol and certain actives can cause a flare up, so a focus on anti-inflammatory properties is beneficial.


We can also prescribe topical and oral medications that are suitable treatments for certain types of rosacea.

Erbium glass laser resurfacing treatments and some chemical peels will help manage rosacea by treating general redness, while LED light therapy can work to calm the effects of inflammation.

Skin redness

What is skin redness?

Unwanted redness in the skin, usually across the face, can be a frustrating and highly visible concern for our patients, as the overall effect can look like you’re constantly flushed, sunburnt or even under the influence!

A common type of redness is in fact a separate condition called rosacea, but this isn’t always the case. General redness can be caused by more than the usual amount of blood vessels nearer to the surface of the skin, increased blood flow to those vessels or prominent individual ones that appear as red lines. Most of this is simply genetic or the effect of cumulative sun exposure as you age, but there are a range of treatments that can visibly reduce the effects.

How do you treat skin redness?

A simple, effective routine with medical-grade skincare is essential for most, but particularly for red, sensitive skin. One of the most important steps is sunscreen each and every day to protect against further sun damage, but actives like niacinamide will boost hydration and repair the skin’s barrier, while vitamin C can help even out skin tone.

In terms of in-clinic treatments, erbium glass laser resurfacing addresses skin redness and builds new, clear and smooth skin from the inside out, particularly with our device that is non-ablative and does no damage to the surface of the skin, and so requires little to no downtime.

Pigmentation

What is skin pigmentation?

Skin pigmentation refers to areas of the skin that are a different shade to your natural skin shade. This may simply be some freckles or it may affect a large area across the face, but the uneven skin tone is a common concern for our patients.

Hyperpigmentation is where the spots are darker, though hypopigmentation can occur when the area is lighter than your natural skin tone.

There are a few causes of hyperpigmentation, like excess sun exposure over time, causing sunspots and other darker areas where too much melanin is being produced. Hypopigmentation can be caused by infections, burns and dermatitis – or you can simply be born with it.

Post-inflammatory pigmentation (PIH) is a concern more likely to affect olive or darker skin tones. It can appear after the skin is exposed to trauma like burns, inflammation and incorrect use of chemical peels. Some clients also experience PIH after flare ups of psoriasis, acne or eczema.

Melasma is a form of hyperpigmentation caused by changing hormones, with other contributing factors being UV, visible light, heat exposure and genetics. The hormonal changes increases the production of melanin, the pigment responsible for darkening the skin. Although it is common in pregnant ladies, earning its nickname ‘the pregnancy mask’, it is also common in non-pregnant people.

How do you treat pigmentation?

For general pigmentation caused by sun exposure, the best treatment is prevention – so daily, generous use of sunscreen; we can’t say it too often – your skin will thank us in many years’ time. In severe cases of existing pigmentation, UV exposure can darken the areas even further, so sunscreen is still one of the best things you can do.


Prescription compounded formulas and medical-grade skincare with feature actives like vitamin C (ascorbic acid) and and vitamin B (niacinimide), can be very effective in lightening, brightening and reducing the appearance of uneven tones.


We can also use dedicated chemical peels to address pigmentation issues, including the powerful three-step Aspect Professional Power Peel for improved skin texture, clarity and visibly brighter skin.


We also offer IV skin brightening and IV skin lightening treatments that can help give your skin a luminous glow, with or without specific pigmentation concerns.

Melasma

What is melasma?

Also known as chloasma or pregnancy mask, melasma is a specific type of skin pigmentation that appears as patchy brown or black areas of excess melanin across the nose, cheeks and forehead, and sometimes even the forearms. It’s usually caused by a hormonal imbalance (therefore more common in women, and during pregnancy), but men can present with it as well. It’s also known to affect olive and darker skin tones more than other skin types.

How do you treat melasma?

Melasma can’t be cured, but for some people it can be managed to the point where it’s unnoticeable. It’s really important that melasma is accurately diagnosed, as it can look similar to other types of hyperpigmentation, with the recommended treatment approach being quite different. The individual response to treatments varies a lot between patients as well.

At Lumea Aesthetics, we usually start treatment with skincare – particularly sunscreen to prevent UV damage from further darkening the condition, and prescribed compound actives featuring hydroquinone, niacinamide (vitamin B), retinoid (vitamin A) and many more. Our doctor can also prescribe oral medication to work alongside medical-grade skincare if your treatment needs extra support.

Carefully selected chemical peels can work well in conjunction with a tailored skincare routine. Glycolic acid peels or those specifically targeted to address pigmentation can be really effective, while also smoothing the skin, repairing the moisture barrier and reducing fine lines and the effects of other sun damage.

Sun damage

What is sun damage?

Some of us may enjoy the look of ‘sun kissed’ skin but in reality, it’s best to limit the relationship between the sun and our skin. If you don’t protect yourself from UV rays (including tanning beds), you’ll eventually discover the effects, including wrinkles, age or sun spots, spider veins, loose skin or a ruddy complexion; all together, these effects are what we call photoaging.

Damage from the sun either causes or exacerbates the majority of the concerns our patients come to us with, so almost everyone will hear about the benefits of sunscreen.

How do you treat sun damage?

The effects of photoaging can fall into two broad categories: pigmentation and texture (which includes wrinkles). Our tailored treatment plan will differ depending on how each affects you, which is why we start with an in-depth consultation.

If the main concern is hyperpigmentation, medical-grade skincare, particularly tailored compound skincare with specific actives can work really well.

If the sun damage has had a stronger effect on texture alongside pigmentation, chemical peels can help to renew the surface of the skin, smoothing away fine lines and reducing the visibility of dark spots.

For more acute texture issues, we often recommend radiofrequency (RF) microneedling with its targeted micro damage within the skin encourages a wound-healing response that creates new, smooth skin.

LED light therapy at the red wavelength also promotes elastin and collagen production, while skin boosters replenish your natural hyaluronic acid stores, to smooth texture and boost luminosity with hydration from the inside out.

Skin texture

What is skin texture?

Before you decide on an aesthetic treatment to address your concerns about skin texture, it’s important to note that all skin has texture! Social media and the wide use of filters has made us sometimes forget that texture is an inherently normal and beautiful part of what makes us individuals. However, our patients do come in with texture concerns that are more pronounced or cause them to be less confident in their skin – which is where we can help.

Unwanted skin texture is often caused by ageing, where our skin doesn’t produce as much elastin and collagen, leading to it becoming more thin, with sagging areas and a crepey appearance. Sun damage is another culprit, causing ruddiness, roughness and wrinkles. Other conditions like acne scarring, rough skin and enlarged pores are also textural issues that our patients look to address.

How do you treat skin texture?

Improving texture starts with a good skincare routine, using medical grade products that can smooth, soften and refine the look and feel of skin, often using targeted actives like AHA and BHAs as exfoliants.


Many of our treatments improve skin texture, either as the main goal or a significant secondary benefit. The same actives in concentrated amounts work really well in chemical peels, resurfacing the skin and helping increase cell turnover to produce new, smoother skin.


Injectable skin boosters improve skin texture by moisturising from within and replacing natural stores of hyaluronic acid lost through ageing.


Radiofrequency (RF) microneedling, Non-ablative laser resurfacing laser, LED light therapy and dermablading all work in different ways to renew and produce fresh skin, while reducing the appearance of fine lines.

Dry skin

What is dry skin?

When depleted of its natural oils and moisture, skin can become dry and feel uncomfortable and tight, looking flaky and dull. More severe cases can see dry skin itchy, red, sore and inflamed, even causing wrinkles and painful deep cracks.

Causes can be anything from genetic with many people having naturally dry skin, to soaps and cleansers that strip the skin, environmental conditions like dry winters or office heating, or of course medical conditions like eczema.

How do you treat dry skin?

The majority of our treatments address dry skin to at least some extent, since improving skin hydration is the key to a smooth, glowy complexion and the foundation for effectively treating other concerns.

Medical-grade skincare is the first step, including a good moisturiser to maintain and balance oils in the skin, hyaluronic acid to boost hydration from within, and sunscreen to prevent damage and dryness from sun exposure.

A concentrated dose of hyaluronic acid can also come from skin boosters, an injectable treatment that restores the skin’s own reserves of the hyaluronic acid which we can lose over time.


Treatments that create microdamage within the skin, producing a natural wound-healing response that boosts collagen and elastin are also fantastic ways to improve hydration – think microneedling and RF microneedling.


Hydration-based chemical peels are also really effective in their own right, or in conjunction with other treatments for a supercharged hydration boost that even the driest of skin would be happy with.


For a true inside-out approach, tailored IV infusions like our Hydrator cocktail delivers a concentrated blend of fluids and electrolytes to your system.


We’ll always encourage a healthy lifestyle too to help maintain healthy, hydrated skin, including lots of water and sleep.

Peach fuzz

What is peach fuzz?

Vellus hair is also known as peach fuzz, is hair on the face that is mostly visible in sunlight, and tends to be softer, lighter and shorter than anywhere else on the body. It’s completely natural and causes no medical issues, but in some people peach fuzz can be quite pronounced and removing it can make the hairline neater and make up easier to apply with a smoother finish.

How do you treat peach fuzz?

Dermablading, also known as dermaplaning, uses a special blade to gently remove dead skin cells and facial hair from the surface of the skin. The simple treatment only takes around 30 minutes and needs zero downtime, making it a fantastic pre-event treatment to leave you refreshed and glowing.

While it works well to shave away peach fuzz, there are many other benefits of dermablading as it’s also a proven dermal exfoliator, removing the very top layer of dead skin cells, leaving smoother and brighter skin with fine lines and scarring less visible.

Stretch marks

What are stretch marks?

Almost everyone knows when they have stretch marks, but you may not know they’re actually a type of scar, caused by elastin and collagen fibres breaking apart. They appear when the skin stretches or shrinks quickly, often during growth spurts, rapid weight gain or pregnancy, particularly across the thighs, hips, breasts, abdomen and buttocks.

Some people are more prone to stretch marks, whether due to genetics, skin type, some medical conditions and even some steroid medications. They rarely cause any discomfort, but we’ve found there’s little that can cause a crisis of confidence for our patients than these tiger marks on their body!

How do you treat stretch marks?

Stretch marks can fade away on their own over time, and though they can be quite difficult to remove, some treatments can effectively help this process along.

Radiofrequency (RF) microneedling creates the most profound results, and all with very minimal downtime and without harming the surface of the skin. Radiofrequency heat energy penetrates deep into the skin, encouraging your body to start its natural wound-healing response and creating new, smoother skin.

Our own approach also includes topical treatments which work synergistically with RF microneedling to boost your results.

Skin dullness

What is dullness?

Dull skin can make its appearance for a number of reasons, but it refers to skin simply simply not being as happy and healthy as it could be. Dryness, cold, dry climates and general ageing are the main contributors, as skin slows down production of collagen and elastin, losing its laxity and rate of cell turnover. A range of lifestyle factors can cause skin to lose its glow, including smoking and a lack of regular skincare.

How do you treat dullness?

A number of our aesthetic treatments can improve dull skin, bringing back a smooth, youthful look. Smooth is the key element here that can achieve this, with chemical peels and dermablading working to exfoliate and hydrate, removing a build up of dead skin cells and dry skin to show the fresh, brighter skin underneath.

Targeted, medical-grade skincare can also deliver actives like AHA and BHA actives for ongoing exfoliation, alongside thorough moisturisation. Retinols boost and protect existing collagen from breaking down further, and topical antioxidants can also breathe new life into dull skin.

Both laser resurfacing and LED light therapy, particularly the red wavelength, encourages collagen and elastin production, as another way to renew the skin. Laser resurfacing set at a particular setting is also a popular pre-event treatment that can provide a short-term plumping and glow effect, while building collagen for longer term benefits, with no downtime.


Working alongside these surface treatments are our IV infusion therapies, particularly the brightening and lightening cocktails for an inside-out approach, with a prescribed blend of antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and fluid to hydrate and improve the overall complexion of your skin.

Find us at our Collingwood clinic

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22 PEEL STREET, COLLINGWOOD VIC 3066

PHONE: 03 6144 6193